Caravan cities are popping up in a tiny Queensland fishing village, as the annual pilgrimage of grey nomads rolls into town

We took off early from Karumba so we’d get to spend the Week in Normanton. It’s a short 70km trip down the road so we got to Normanton pretty early with the intention of staying for the day, watching the Freo Dockers play the semi-finals at a pub somewhere and then taking off towards Cairns and camping near by the sea Karumba Point Sunset Caravan Park.

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  • En-Suited Cabins, Villas, Campsites (Powered/UN-powered sites).
  • Next to the beach & boat ramp. Shady, well grassed sites.
  • Free BBQ area. Fish Cleaning Area.
  • Swimming Pool with Entertainment area.
  • Spit Roast Nights & Entertainment.
  • Happy Hours, Disabled Shower/Toilet.
  • 2 Spotless Shower/Toilet Blocks, Coin Operated Laundry.
  • Mini-Mart / Cafe / Tackle / Souvenirs, Craft days, 3 Public Telephones.
  • Fishing Charters / Flights and other Local Tour Bookings, Campers Kitchen.

Normanton has a first class visitor center. It’s more like a museum with heaps of info on history plus there’s lounges to lay about on if you want to relax in the air-conditioning and computers to play on and the chap behind the counter was very helpful. Normanton has some interesting history with it’s remote location, gold rushes, railway and boom – bust cycles. There’s lots of historic buildings including the one the visitor center is located in.

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We had a look at the big croc which is a statue of an 8.64m crocodile named Krys that was taken from the Norman River in 1957 – the biggest crocodile ever captured in Australia. There’s also a big barra for another round of photos. Cruising through town we noticed some advertising for the Normanton Races which were coincidentally being held whilst we were there. So we thought we’d go check it out why not.

We mingled with the boys in their boots and jeans and tucked in shirts and watched a couple of races. After that we spent a couple of days fishing where we caught Big Barramundi,  Salmon (Blue & King) and Spanish Mackerel.

There are so many options when it comes to fishing at Karumba that sometimes it’s hard to know where to begin! A good spot for starters is the Norman River, where you’ll find huge fish like.

Barramundi

Russell with a big size excellent Barra. Russell stays in Karumba Point Sunset Caravan Park.

The Barramundi is widely regarded as Australia’s premier native sport fish and the Gulf Country in Tropical North Queensland offers excellent opportunities to target this much sought after species. Regarded as a true sporting fish with great fighting ability, the bite is sudden and savage and once hooked barramundi perform aerobatics and repeated powerful runs for cover in snags. The Australian record catch for a Barra is 37.85kg. Size and bag limits do apply.

Salmon (Blue & King)

Nothing like a good feed of Bluenose Salmon. Perfect catch Daisy.

Here in Tropical North Queensland we have two species, the blue salmon and the threadfin or king salmon as it is called in Queens land. Our species are great sport on light tackle and readily take lures or flies when fishing for Barramundi. Its firm white flesh is arguably better eating than barramundi, easy to fillet and freezes quite well. Average captures vary from 50cm to just under 1 M., and size and bag limits do apply.

Javelin (Grunter)

Jan and Kev are into the Grunter today. Average 65 cms. Great eating fish.

Grunter (javelin fish) are probably the most prolific fish in our estuary and tidal systems and many a bait fishing outing has been saved by the catching of dozens of these common, but very underrated fish. They are one of the best eating fish to come from our waters, but being so easy to catch, do not have the glamour nor appeal of the more famous species like Mangrove Jacks or Barramundi. Size and bag limits do apply to grunter. Soft white flesh and excellent eating.

Fingermark (Golden Snapper)

The finger mark bream (spotted scale sea perch – big scale red) derives its name from the distinctive “thumb print” like black spot found near its tail when just landed. This spot will fade as the fish dies as will its magnificent copper colouring. It is a splendid fish, highly prized for its eating qualities ( arguably the best eating fish to come from the estuaries) and offers a dogged hard fight to the boat. Finger mark show exceptionally slow growth rates, take only what you need for a good feed as fish stocks can easily be put under pressure from over fishing. Size and bag limits do apply.

Spanish MackerelThe big Spanish Mackerel are now on the run

Narrow-Barred Mackerel or Tanguigue (more commonly called Spanish Mackerel or just Spaniards) are the prime target in our waters with specimens to over 60 lb (27 kg) common. They will readily take jigged chrome slices, trolled or floated garfish and pilchard baits as well as trolled lures. Sport fishing tackle of at least 6 kg is preferred with the use of a heavy wire leader and black swivels essential for both lure and bait fishing. Once hooked Spaniards will make one long spirited run and usually tire shortly after, smaller shorter runs precede gaffing at the boat. Spaniards are excellent eating but must be killed by a sharp blow to the head and bled immediately upon capture. This will not only preserve the flesh but make them much easier/ safer to handle, most anglers will carry a heavy wooden “donger”, similar to a small baseball bat, on board for this purpose. The fish can either be cut up into steaks or filleted and skinned, either way the flesh is excellent eating. Size and bag limits do apply.

Karumba Point Sunset Caravan Park All Images

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BOOK NOW! for August, September, and October. You may also do advanced booking for November, December and January.
Postal Address: Karumba Point Sunset Caravan Park, PO Box 61 Karumba Queensland 4891
Tel: (07) 4745 9277
Fax (07) 4745 9480
E-mail: info@sunsetcp.com.au

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